Monday, 1 June 2020

The tobacco economists network Part 24 of many

Overview of previous posts here

Overview of meetings

1985
William F. Shughart II
Thomas Borcherding
Dwight Lee
Fred McChesney
Robert D. Tollison

1986
Keith Watson
Joseph M. Jadlow
Robert D. Tollison
Robert Ekelund, Jr.
Richard E. Wagner
Henry N. Butler
George E. Hoffer
Robert D. Tollison
Michael D. Pratt
Gary M. Anderson
William Shughart, II
John H. Bowman
1988
Western Economic Association
Dwight R. Lee
Richard Wagner
Paul W. Wilson
Thomas Borcherding
Benjamin Zycher


Dwight R. Lee
Richard Wagner
Bruce Yandle
Robert Staaf

Robert Ekelund Jr.
Dwight R. Lee
Randall Holcombe
Joseph Jadlow
Henry Butler

1989
Robert D. Tollison
Gary M. Anderson
Bruce L. Benson
Richard Wagner
David Gay
Dwight R. Lee
Dwight R. Lee
Richard McKenzie
David Gay
Edward Price
Richard Wagner

Southern Economic Association
Robert B. Ekelund
Richard W. Ault
Keith Watson
John D. Jackson
Mark Thornton
Henry N. Butler

Richard Saba
James Savarese

1990
Robert B. Ekelund
Richard W. Ault
Keith Watson
John D. Jackson
Mark Thornton
Richard Saba
Richard Wagner
Dwight R. Lee
Fred McChesney
Robert Tollison
Kevin Grier
Bruce Yandle
Richard Wagner
Daniel P.  Williamson
Dwight R. Lee

Benjamin Zycher
Gary M. Anderson

1991
Richard Wagner
Steve Jackstadt
Dwight R. Lee
Benjamin Zycher


Robert Ekelund Jr.
Dwight R. Lee
Robert Tollison
Richard W. Ault
John Keith Watson
John D. Jackson


Apparently, the industry wanted feedback, as there are reports of the meetings, such as one written by Dwight R. Lee and one by Richard Wagner. The reports show  the sessions usually were attended by 20 to 25 people, sometimes only a dozen or fifteen

Thus the industry paid a lot (in 1991: $5,000 per economist) to reach virtually no one. Perhaps this is one of the reasons the industry in the 1990's shifted to working with think tanks. The industry also stopped sending economists to these conferences after 1991 becaused the Tobacco Institute faced a $1 million budget cut that year (this will be explored in another blogpost).

There may have been more meetings (there is no LTDL  record of one in 1987) but the point is clear: the LTDL shows us for years the tobacco industry was able to spread its message to non-network economists by using an anti-tax strategy

The purpose of the economists appearing at these meetings was clear: plant a seed, in the hope slowly the arguments would be copied by other economists. Savarese wrote
James M. Savarese

Daniel P. Williamson attended the Western Economic Association meeting in 1990 as discussant and was paid for his expenses.  A choice the industry probably regretted, as Williamson must not have understood why he was there and criticized the output of the other economists.

Needless to say he does not reappear in the LTDL... 

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